Does any other state have these laws.

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Yeah, several other states have that law in affect. Arkansas was just late catching up to the game.

Even with the law, I still prefer to have a big, heavy Streamlight when I'm near a roadway. If they don't see me before they get to me, still makes a great item to attract their attention when it makes contact with their windshield. :P
lol i think all states need a move over law
Am I missing something? How could a 'move over' law have had any effect on the incidents shown on that video? After all, every one of those morons was moving to the right. And most of them stopped fairly quickly...

All we can hope for is that the drivers of those cars saw the inside of a prison. Accidents happen, but hell, I have trouble calling those 'collisions' accidents. Just get those idiots off of the roads!
Tennessee has the move over law. People are starting to do it for the most part, but there are still those that just don't pay attention.
Wisconsin also has this law but the law has been in affect for a while and people still dont move over its become that u see lights and sirens its no big deal well Manyofficers firefighters and others on the road sides doing there job are hurt or worse killed slow down when u see flashing lights move over if safe and drive cautisly.
I think you're misintrepping the law.The Move Over law means, if there is another lane avialable (to the left) you must move into it if safe to do so. If not, you must reduce your speed by half. This gives Emergency Personell some space to work safely. Every one of those incidents would have been prevented if the cars had moved into the adjacent (left) lane and/or slowed thier speed.

We have this law in Ontario as well (as well as other provinces). Don't let it lull you into a false sense of security, even with a lot of a press many people are not aware.. and let's face it, common sense just isn't all that common!
Texas has a move over law. Either move over and if not possible slow to less then 20 miles under the speed limit or real slow if speed limit is 25 MPH or lower. Seems to work well and I even see drivers doing it for non emergency vehicles too, i.e. broke down vehicles. The problem I do see is drivers not being courteous and yielding to others who are in the right lane and want to move to the left which is the safest lane. I just recently moved to TX from CA where the law didn't exist when I left. Don't know about now in CA, but if not, why not? All states should because it makes sense. TCSS and watch your back while parked.
Spanner, Well said about common sense being an oxymoron.
PA also has the law. We are still in the education phase. I hope it doesn't take as long asit has for people to begin pulling over for lights and sirens.
The AAA has a nice comercial spot on the law.
OK Spanner, it seems that I'm confusing the Move Over law with something else. That something else being that I've read often that you are obliged to move to the right and stop if a police/emergency vehicle is coming towards you - that's correct I think? So the Move Over law is for when you're approaching a stopped police/emergency vehicle, then you move to the left, away from them, for safety. If those two thoughts of mine are correct, then I now understand this thread.

We have a law to cover an approaching police/emergency vehicle, that's covered. We have a move to create a new law that will oblige people to slow to 40 km/h (about 25 mph) when approaching and passing a police or emergency vehicle stopped on the road with it's warning lights flashing. If that new law is passed then it should make things a little safer for us.
It should be renamed uncommon sense...
Illinois has this law, but I don't think they publicized it enough. People still do not move over.

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