Now that I am thinking of moving from the right hand seat to the office where I will be ordering equipment, etc. one of the things that has come up is the need to purchase axe belts. Even our more remote stations like the idea of having both hand free instead of having to carry an axe. I've never used one, probably because it was something that only the truckee's used. Now if we are talking hazmat or fire prevention for chemical facilities, then I'm your favorite firefighter to know. But in the case of an Axe Belt, I have seen a leather one that has a leather belt and one that a salesman came in and demonstrated... It's a combo RIC / Axe Belt. Regardless, I don't know much about this topic and would appreciate any input you could provide.

Do you think that an axe belt should have both components?

What advice could you share in regard to what I should possibly order?


There's no sense in reinventing the wheel here. Your opinion and expertice are appreciated.

Mike Schlags, Fire Captain
Santa Barbara, CA
mschlags@yahoo.com


Here's the pictures I took of the prototype RIC Axe Belt:






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I have a Kevlar belt - got it from Golfire. I like those guys - good to do business with and it's plenty enough for me. It has an axe loop instead of a holster, but you could put one on. I have a big pouch with my rope and a small one with some tools on mine. The Golfire belt is a cheaper version of the Colorado Truckman Belt (in fact the maker told me he had to change it because he was infringing on the Colorado copyright a bit much). Anyway, the Colorado Belt is more, but I suspect it is worth it IF you need a RIC feature. My needs are very limited - small rural department. Third story is the most I worry about and not many of those. We don't do RIC ops formally, so for me it's really just an axe belt, but there are even cheaper ones. I'm the only guy on my dept. to carry a rope. That and a carabiner is my escape kit. So I'm not the guy to take too much advice from, but that's my two cents.

Here's the link to Golfire www.gloveholders.com

Here's the link to Colorado Belt www.fireinnovations.com

Here's a Firehouse forum on the same topic for ideas - they recommend some others http://forums.firehouse.com/showthread.php?t=53093
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Mike,
I sent you an email regarding this.

Jason
Andy, Thanks for taking the time to share the links and information. I look forward to taking a look at the info. TCSS, Mike
thanks for the input, I will followup on your information. take care, mike
I like the GUT belt. It has the rings on it for holding the tools on the belt. They can be used for escape as well. Good belts.
Than there is the Leather Truckman's belt sold at the Firestore with the same type of uses. But the GUT belt is more durable.
I purchased a Truckman's belt from THEFIRESTORE.COM and even though I have not had the opportunity to field test it yet, it seems like it would be great. It is a leather belt with a large clasp connector, several size adjustments, a large tool ring and tool clip. It seems simple yet durable. I have had alot of success with this website, hope this helps.
Just be aware that it is not rated for anything else than carrying your tools. It would be a shame to try and bail on your new belt and go crashing to the ground.
Mike

Having Worked on a truck for a few yrs. I liked wearing the basic scabbard. Particulary if I am cutting on the roof or doing forcible entry, I dont have 50 extra lbs ontop of what I am already are wearing. I even wear it working on the engine. It is the the same one that L.A.city & County use. $40-50.00 at most firefighter shops.

Take care
Trkmant46
your reply mirrored what our younger truck guys want... gracias' buddy... tcss, mike
excellent point, thanks for the input!
Did you get the email with the information that I sent to you with the different belts?

Thanks,
Jason
Mike,

You can purchase leather axe sheaths seperately, then install them on the GUT belts, too.
Our truck co uses the GUT belts, but we don't use the axe sheaths.

Our primary truck tools are married irons carried in a Milwaukee strap. That keeps the hands free without having to wear the tools. http://www.savelives.com/images_full/rbfab/rbirs125_full.jpg

We also use New York roof hooks, and they're too long (5 or 6 feet) to wear.

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