Is Your Department Ready for a Rapid Intervention Event?

Forming a rapid intervention committee allows fire departments to focus on awareness, readiness and response to mayday events

 

On the fireground, what makes things real for you as a firefighter? What gets your heart racing, your blood pumping? Fire and angry, black smoke surrounding the house on arrival? Bystanders on the scene screaming that someone is still inside? Or the sound of “mayday, mayday!” over the radio at the height of an operation?

Any of these can put your brain into overload—naval aviators call this “helmet fire.” Everything you experience during stressful situations will tax your ability to handle the crisis—but a mayday call will take you to your limit.

So ask yourself this question: Whether you’re the downed firefighter calling the mayday, a member of the rapid intervention crew (RIC) responding to it or the incident commander trying to get control of it, are you really ready to handle it?

 

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How is your RIT, RIC or FAST made up?


Is it a company assigned on the initial alarm or are they special-called by the incident commander?


What company is given the assignment? (Engine, Truck, Rescue, etc.)


How often have you had two RIT companies on the scene?

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Third due Engine on First Alarm is automatically assigned RIT. No other duties that would interefere with this assignment are allowed.

Volunteer Fire Department - When working fire is declared automatic mutual aide for RIT. My department is always the ladder as it has all the tools we have designated for each members assigned role on the RIT team. Will call for 2 RIT companies for commercial establisments or high occupancy structures



Michael McCarthy said:

Volunteer Fire Department - When working fire is declared automatic mutual aide for RIT. My department is always the ladder as it has all the tools we have designated for each members assigned role on the RIT team. Will call for 2 RIT companies for commercial establisments or high occupancy structures

I am curious. What is the response time for the mutual aid unit(s)? How do the earlier arriving units approach the fire prior to RIT being in place?

If you are asking if the 2 in 2 out theory is thoroughly adhered to on the initial alarm -- to be truthful -- no. Although we don't ride with riding positions designated we do have positions known as nozzle, back-up, control, Officer and chauffer positions on the engines. Mutual aide units / RIT are usually about 5-7 minutes from the time of notification to the time on scene. Things may vary somewhat in a all volunteer county from area to area,  as some other volunteer departments are staffed less than others.

On any alarm of fire, Odor of Smoke, Or smoke in the building The RIT is dispatched.
Our RIT is made up of 5 to 8 qualified firefighters whom Respond on the engine Duties include throwing ladders,Continuous Size up, Potentially Forced entry and fire suppression if the need arises. Upon arrival the crew will assemble all tools and stage within close proximity of the structure while the officer reports to the IC. 1 member of the crew will then perform a size up and determine if additional entry or egress points need to be made or sustained.
On any commercial structure 3000 square feet or more, multiple RIT will be called.



Kyle said:

On any alarm of fire, Odor of Smoke, Or smoke in the building The RIT is dispatched.
Our RIT is made up of 5 to 8 qualified firefighters whom Respond on the engine Duties include throwing ladders,Continuous Size up, Potentially Forced entry and fire suppression if the need arises. Upon arrival the crew will assemble all tools and stage within close proximity of the structure while the officer reports to the IC. 1 member of the crew will then perform a size up and determine if additional entry or egress points need to be made or sustained.
On any commercial structure 3000 square feet or more, multiple RIT will be called.
I like that your RIT has it's own suppression ability.
Captnjak, We've looked over many different departments Sop's and Sog's regarding RIT. Too many times I've read about crews having to rely on other operating apparatus for suppression. Another thing we like to do if possible is obtain our own Hydrant

The first department i worked for, All personnel are required to be RIC trained. Our RIC was the second due or under the Chiefs discretion, SOPs for a one story single family fire we would have four engines, one truck, one light/air, and one rescue on scene. all will be dispatch at the same time, typical RIC SOPs, as arrive on scene establish RIC, size up/ utilities, suppression, tool cache, RIC bag at each door, consant communication with safety officer and command.

 

the RIT team is assign as soon as there is a confirmed fire in the building.

They put a reflective bib on their scba and they're assigned to do some outsides jobs like break windows and ladder the building just in case there is somebody who need to make out his way oustcide the building or to be able to go save a fellow firefighter who's trapped in a building quicker

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