Forest fires are still in all developed countries, traditional fire
It is not to control the fire until extinguished itself
Why did not we look for modern innovations?
Where plans benefit from the lessons of the previous fires
Unfortunately, fire-fighting late Kabri countries

http://delcominfotech.com/technology/spotlight-dr-mustafa-el-nahrawy/

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A raging blaze that has swept out of control and burned an area almost the size of Los Angeles has been declared the largest wildfire in California’s history.

Twin fires being treated as a single incident are currently threatening more than 11,000 buildings. In total about 14,000 firefighters are battling more than a dozen incidents across the state, according to the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

One of the wildfires, 225 miles (360 kilometers) north of San Francisco, was ignited two weeks ago by sparks from the steel wheel of a trailer being towed with a flat tire.

Climate and fire experts blame hotter weather for drying out vegetation, which helps fires to spread quickly. The expansion of towns and cities into previously undeveloped areas also plays its part.

traditional methods involve !st creating a fire break and stopping the advance of the main fire, Quite often starting stop-gap fires to burn out a section of fuel prior to the advancing fire. But this is a very risky maneuver due to the fact that a control fire can get out of hand very quickly.

breaking ground in a wide swath can accomplish the same thing but it involves equipment and lots of manpower to accomplish, and time is a factor as well.

depending on how extensive a wildfire is there is a point where it cannot be fought effectively and its better to concentrate efforts on evacuation of the local populace.

one of the better methods of preventing fires lies with the education of people, for example burning rubbish!

enclosed burning areas and maintaining a fire watch is essential, Properly preparing for a controlled burn can minimize the possibilities of it getting out of control.

a burning pit can be made by digging down a few inches into the dirt and building a wall of stone or mud bricks (about a foot or two tall)

a cleared burn site free of loose dry grass, etc. and away from nearby brush and forest is a must.

all too often the brush fires were from someone burning too close to wooded areas or tall grass.

sadly it is of my opinion that there is not enough being taught in schools about fire safety.

it is one topic that should be taught extensively in every grade and college semester!

Mr. Ted Mead
Thank you for that information
But the first goal is to block the flames
No matter what time
Look at the new thought to provide a lot of equipment and firefighters
We have a new idea of ​​a truck that carries a load and carries a load of up to 6 fire engines
The fire is first surrounded and the fire is extinguished
Second, putting down forest fires by aircraft is ineffective to waste fire extinguishers far from the target of fire
I teach you safety from fire hazards
Currently I am a project provider in Egypt to spread the intellectual and scientific awareness of students in schools and universities
We have worked together to build up generations of fire safety and crisis management
And the implementation of a patented invention, the first system in the world to extinguish the fires of infancy

Thank you for teaching the young!

I suppose equipment design is primarily affected by the environmental factors of their location.
for instance my area has a lot of woodland and uneven terrain.
getting heavy equipment to it presents quite a challenge here is where fire flights are best suited.
access roads may not always be available and i've seen some wildfires where we could only access them via UTV.
luckily there are logging roads we can use if needed, Our utility and brush trucks carry small tanks and pumps to run the small hoses and fill the backpack cans.
regardless of terrain its still a logistical puzzle centering on access to the fire. well equipped utility trucks are often the best answer. but we cannot dismiss the idea of specialty tankers and engines.
we used to fight oil fires in the navy and a good high volume foam pumper was a must.
heres a thought water laden with calcium carbonate spread in a wide pattern for a fire brake can diminish the chance of a fire spreading past it by both reducing the heat and releasing co2, and the more the fire is knocked down the quicker it is to put out

Mr. Ted Mead
The debate continues until success on the elimination of major fires
Farewell to traditional firefighters
We have modern techniques of civil protection
And to preserve spirits and private and public property
And environmental protection from fire exhausts.
http://delcominfotech.com/technology/spotlight-dr-mustafa-el-nahrawy/

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all well and good if you have the funding needed.

but specialty equipment limits itself to the variety of fires it can handle.

not every house fire is exactly the same and you cannot forsee change in wind conditions rapidly enough for special equipment to handle it.

here in lies the training!

our people are trained to handle structure (house farm, commercial, and industrial), refinery and oil fires, vehicular, aircraft, and forest fires, not to mention duties as police am Emt/ life support.

including vehicle/aircraft rescue, and marine rescue.

technology is great and makes our job easier and safer but replacing a traditional firefighter? doubtful at best.

can a machine itself decide to ascend the stairs or rappel down the side of a building to rescue? No it cant!

nor can it decide whether co2 flooding or halon is preferable to water and foam.

they cant decide where to ventilate/de-smoke a building themselves

no the traditional firefighter will still be around for a long time to come.

dont get me wrong on this

develop technology to assist the fire fighter and prevent fires in the first place.

for example a robotic water cannon! first entry to suppress a blaze down enough to minimize injury to the crews who enter a building.

Better breathing systems and mobile air recharge equipment.

better and more efficient sprinkler systems, fire resistant stairways and emergency exit systems.

automated evacuation direction ( in the event a path is unsafe multiple display screens of alternate evacuation routes ) and accountability mustering roll calls.

these things help firefighters most of all

my dear /Ted Mead The dialogue with you is good We have to look at current and future climate changes We look at the facilities where the automatic fire extinguishers are installed However, the fires react? We have to look at jet planes and firefighting helicopters that drop materials Which scattered far from the aim of extinguishing the fire There are many drawbacks in extinguishing fires in developed countries And we have to fix what can be repaired To preserve human and animal lives and green environment forests Private and public property I want to finance and to think and implement equipment that minimizes losses Regards

my dear / Ted Mead 
The dialogue with you is good
We have to look at current and future climate changes
We look at the facilities where the automatic fire extinguishers are installed
However, the fires react?
We have to look at jet planes and firefighting helicopters that drop materials
Which scattered far from the aim of extinguishing the fire
There are many drawbacks in extinguishing fires in developed countries
And we have to fix what can be repaired
To preserve human and animal lives and green environment forests
Private and public property
I want to finance and to think and implement equipment that minimizes losses
Regards

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